Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

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white exec
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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by white exec » 03 Oct 2019, 21:02

You could always fit Valprex valves, and invest in a Tecnosir kit.
Transport the precious spheres de-pressurised, then no need to declare gas-pressured items.
Low temp damage to unstressed membranes should not be significant, I guess.

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by kenbw2 » 03 Oct 2019, 21:08

Mandrake wrote:
03 Oct 2019, 21:02
kenbw2 wrote:
03 Oct 2019, 20:50
Stickyfinger wrote:
03 Oct 2019, 20:49
You will NOT be able to take them in the cabin.....do not even ask.
But if they go in the hold they're at risk of becoming damaged by the temps?
Does anyone know what temperature a cargo hold in a passenger plane is though ?
Not terribly cold actually it seems: https://travel.stackexchange.com/questi ... e-airplane

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by myglaren » 03 Oct 2019, 21:22

Would it help to pack them in insulating material; polystyrene perhaps?

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by Stickyfinger » 03 Oct 2019, 21:34

They are not Lancaster Bombers chaps, no nose gunner letting all the cold air in :)

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by GiveMeABreak » 03 Oct 2019, 21:59

And not forgetting they look like a pair of grenades. Fingers crossed you don’t have any hassle.

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by Jaf » 03 Oct 2019, 22:59

Ah...makes me nostalgic this. My sister took a starter motor in hand luggage to India in early 90s. For my dad’s vw type 2 camper.

Sorry absolutely no help!

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by myglaren » 03 Oct 2019, 23:06

Starters don't look as sinister as Citroen spheres.

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by teuski » 04 Oct 2019, 11:42

myglaren wrote:
03 Oct 2019, 14:22
Definitely make them aware of what they are well in advance.
The link is dead now but they caused a serious bomb scare a few years ago when someone dug some up in an allotment and took them to the police station.
We've had that here in Finland too:
Image

And about the temperatures, down to -30 degrees celsius and even colder is where we DRIVE our Citroens :D

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by kenbw2 » 04 Oct 2019, 17:42

So an update - I got through check-in with them looking very confused by my photo. Got sent to the funky baggage desk where they x-rayed it and declared it to be fine.

Fingers crossed they survive the journey unscathed

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by kenbw2 » 05 Oct 2019, 23:22

Got to the other side with no enquiries, no indication they've been inspected. So all is well.

Thanks guys!

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by bobins » 06 Oct 2019, 17:55

I can just imagine them X-raying it and there being a stray USB cable in your bag along with a sphere. You can guess what it'd look like........ :lol:
sphere bang.jpg
Sphere bomb
sphere bang.jpg (5.78 KiB) Viewed 120 times

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by van ordinaire » 06 Oct 2019, 22:48

"Have you got automobile parts in there?" is the usual question I get asked by American airport security but only had a problem with tailgate struts, despite my pointing out they were hydraulic - & fully extended. It was suggested I mailed them to myself - what by surface mail?

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by teuski » 07 Oct 2019, 05:13

kenbw2 wrote:
05 Oct 2019, 23:22
Got to the other side with no enquiries, no indication they've been inspected. So all is well.

Thanks guys!
Keep your eyes open, there's a good chance that you're being watched :-D
Maybe they just let you go in hopes of catching an entire terrorist cell. Do a favor to your local Citroën enthusiasts and stay away from meetings for a while ;)

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by soufle » 08 Oct 2019, 00:06

I'm amazed they let them on, anything pressurised is immediately a red flag with airlines. The physics should be all fine for transport as everyone has related but nevertheless. I took a gas bottle on a flight years ago after a camping trip in central Oz and the check in chick was like whatever. Before 9/11 of course.

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Re: Xantia suspension spheres in an aeroplane's hold - can they stand the pressure?

Post by kenbw2 » 08 Oct 2019, 00:51

soufle wrote:
08 Oct 2019, 00:06
I'm amazed they let them on, anything pressurised is immediately a red flag with airlines. The physics should be all fine for transport as everyone has related but nevertheless. I took a gas bottle on a flight years ago after a camping trip in central Oz and the check in chick was like whatever. Before 9/11 of course.
They did ask a load of questions. "Is it pressurised?" "Does have oil in it?" "Does it have gas in it?"

I didn't know what the 'right' answers were so I became the "I know nothing about cars" guy and pleaded ignorance. "Dunno, I just know the car needs them".