Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Tell us your ongoing tales and experiences with your French car here. Post pictures of your car here as well.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 02 Jan 2020, 00:25

They are used by a whole load of cars. The injection system was bought in by Lada from GM, most of the parts being made by Bosch - so it's probably common to a plethora of 90s Vauxhalls among other things.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 05 Jan 2020, 23:27

The previously weeping brake caliper on the Lada which had stopped for several weeks has resumed leaking. It drops the level enough to just start to flicker the warning light in about two weeks of normal use, so not unmanageable...but braking issues need fixing rather than accomodating. Especially as the car is off to a new owner hopefully this week.

I've known these cars for years and the calipers are usually pretty reliable unless they're irreparably seized from disuse so a service kit usually does the job. Grabbed this a few weeks ago.

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In theory this should be a pretty simple job.

[] Clamp the feed line from the reservoir.
[] Remove wheel.
[] Remove brake pads.
[] Disconnect brake hose.
[] Remove caliper.
[] Remove piston(s).
[] Remove seal.
[] Clean bore.
[] Insert new seal.
[] Insert new piston.
[] Reattach caliper.
[] Reattach brake hose.
[] Reinsert pads.
[] Remove hose clamp.
[] Bleed system.

However I know full well that these jobs tend to grow arms and legs so was fully prepared for all hell to break loose.

The problem is obvious.

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The horrible, horrible mess is far more obvious once the wheel is off. Yuck.

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Yep, it be a piston seal that's leaking. Didn't expect otherwise really.

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These brakes are refreshingly easy to work on. The pad retaining rods are floating on springs (so they're *usually* not seized) and come straight out once two P clips are pulled off. Then the pads lift straight out, and two further bolts (17mm) allow the caliper to be removed from the hub.

I had originally planned to change the flexible line as well but the union at the inner wing end didn't immediately relent when presented with a spanner so I opted for "leave it well alone" as one of the main targets for this job was not to generate a bigger to do list than I started with.

Getting the piston out required a bit of perseverance simply because I didn't have a helper to press the pedal while I kept an eye on things and compressed air was out of the question as my compressor is currently out of commission until I find out why it's tripping the RCD.

Wasn't too hard though, with the dust boot removed it was easy enough to pull it free while slowly rotating it.

The fluid actually in there didn't really look too bad and there was no puddle of metallic sludge in there like I've found in a few older calipers.

There wasn't really any obvious damage to either the piston or the seal at a glance.

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Though the new seal is a more snug fit to the piston, there's visible clearance between the old seal and piston.

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(Trying to photograph that was an utter pain).

The only signs of damage I could see were some *really* fine scratching/pitting near the outer edge.

Ignore the mangled finish on the inner area of the step, that's just from me wrestling it out of the caliper , and is the area normally outside the dust boot.

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This isn't enough to feel with a fingernail and is only visible when the light catches it just right. I guess it's enough though given the clearances involved.

I made the executive decision to leave the outboard piston alone. There's absolutely no sign of leakage from it at this stage (I did have a peek under the rubber dust boot), and given that pulling the caliper takes all of five minutes, it's not the end of the world if it needs to be revisited.

No photos from the actual dismantling and reassembly process I'm afraid as I was predictably absolutely covered in a horrible slimy congealed brake dust/brake fluid mixture.

This was snapped once I'd reassembled everything and changed into a fresh pair of gloves.

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The bleed nipple even came undone without undue force (it was slightly rounded off though, so the new one from the service kit was fitted - dust cap has since been added).

Then hooked up the Easybleed and let it run until I had a steady stream of clean fluid running through.

Then it was just a matter of double checking the fluid level...

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...5-10mm above the mounting bracket is correct.

Then going for a test drive. Well it would have been if the headlights hadn't then decided to play up.

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Nearside is lit at roughly 50%, and doesn't respond to switching between dip and main beam.

Tapping the relay that handles that headlight with the handle of a screwdriver immediately restored normal operation.

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The headlights on this while not being quite up there with some of the modern cars with good HID setups are by quite a long way the best of any classic I've driven. Definitely an example of what the humble H4 headlight bulb can actually do with a decent optical system to work with. I've got a spare relay in stock, so will change that out to hopefully prevent further issues with that.

There's still more travel in the pedal than I'd like so I reckon there might still be a bit of air in the system. I'll go back and bleed everything again thoroughly tomorrow - didn't want to start on that today as A: it was nearly dark by that point and B: I had run out of brake fluid as of filling the Easybleed.

While there is a bit too much free travel, the tendency to wander under heavy braking has been vastly reduced and the brakes generally feel more positive...hard to quantify the feeling of them biting, but they definitely feel better than before this work was done. Let's see what a full system bleed does for things - it's a few years since I changed the fluid now anyway so it's worth flushing through anyway. Checking the fluid after the run out hasn't shown any level drop and I can't see any signs of leakage from the wheel...though there's enough goop round there it's kind of hard to tell.

Have parked the car the other way around tonight so hopefully I'll be able to see tomorrow if I've stopped the leak...it was leaving a few drops overnight before.

Hopefully this is one job ticked off...was actually quite a pleasant one to do to be honest, if a bit messy.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by van ordinaire » 06 Jan 2020, 01:31

Congratulations on the brake job almost a forgotten art simply because seals no longer seem available for most cars. In fact the last caliper I had done was the Niva. There was a parts place in Northampton that used to do things like that, when I asked them they said if you can get the seals, we'll do it. There was a place (in West London I think) that did mail order Lada parts, so I duly turned up at the shop with the caliper + seals - think they wee a bit surprised it was a 3-pot job but not deterred. Seem to recall you had to split the caliper, it became so much easier - IF you could get the bits.
Both my P6B's & the 2.5PI had ex-Lada headlights (albeit with mega-wattage bulbs) when I dumped the sealed beams, because they seemed to be ersatz Hellas, thus with excellent optics, readily available from my local used parts emporium - & cheap as chips.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 06 Jan 2020, 02:15

Aye, the Niva three pot calipers need to be split, still not a bad job really. These ones don't require any special treatment though at least.

Worst calipers I've ever done battle with were the four pot ones used on the Skoda Estelles. They worked really well when they worked, lovely light progressive pedal and plenty of stopping power when asked but without being snatchy (important in a rear engined car!). However they were an absolute pig to work on. Everything seized to everything else, and trying to get the pistons back into the bores straight I think took years off my life...even when just changing pads...yes, even with the right tool.

Think my Rapid was the only car I ever bought a new pair of calipers for at pretty much full retail price as it was either that or a pack of matches by that point. Think I'd had everything apart about five times at that point and they were still acting up. Then about a fortnight later the gear linkage snapped. That car was an absolute ungrateful swine from the day I bought it.

Rover P6 rears are... interesting. Not sure if hateful, just odd and awkward. Sure if they weren't inboard they wouldn't seem half as irritating. It's fifteen years since I touched a P6 though, so my memory on the service procedure isn't 100%.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by van ordinaire » 06 Jan 2020, 23:32

Seem to recall that all early callipers had to be split which is why overhauling them was never a D-I-Y job in my book. Dunno when that changed - but it passed me by - then you couldn't get the seals (except for Russian - & American, vehicles!).

I've not been near a P6 for far longer but, as I suggested, it was all a matter of attitude, you needed nice weather & all the time in the world.
In any event rather do a P6 (or even Jag inboards) anyday, than even go near a "Flying Pig" again.

I bought a calliper for my 1st STS (because I didn't know any better) but don't recall it being terribly expensive - at least not from O'Reily's! (AND I got the core charge back, from another branch, the following year)

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 08 Jan 2020, 00:48

Today involved a lot of running around in circles while also trying to get the Lada ready for tomorrow.

By 1500 or so I finally actually managed to get to the car.

[] Steering box oil topped up, check. Still sodding awkward.

[] Gearbox oil checked - didn't need any.

[] Diff oil checked - didn't need any (despite having looked like it leaks like a sieve since I got the car, it's never used a drop).

[] Screen was topped up.

[] Engine oil checked.

[] Clutch fluid checked.

[] Brake fluid checked.

[] About 30 litres of LHM and goodness only knows how many bits and pieces removed from the boot - and dumped in the Xantia instead.

Having been on daily duties for the last couple of weeks the car was generally a bit grubby, not in a condition I really wanted to hand it over in.

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Not having time to give it a proper clean myself today (especially as I was rapidly running out of daylight by that point) I decided to run round to one of the hand car washes need us which I actually trust. Sadly I discovered they're closed on Tuesdays...so reverted back to the one just round the corner from us.

This it turned out was a mistake. Despite me telling them no less than four times NOT to spray TFR all over the car...they did anyway.

So I wound up with a car which was no longer shiny and was covered in splotchy marks. They were very apologetic and then spent half an hour frantically hand polishing it, which made it slightly less dull but still covered in splotches. Not amused.

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That's the third time they've done that now...suffice to say I won't be darkening their door again. Ever. I usually try to do this sort of thing myself...but if I don't have time it will be Magic Hand over by Tongwell who will get my business. They have never failed to follow my instructions - and in fact the first time I was there specific said to me before I even got to the front of the queue that they wouldn't be using any of the stronger chemicals because it would dull my paintwork.

At least they didn't do a bad job of the interior.

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Next step: digging all the bits of Lada out the garage and from out back.

Couple of things I've not been able to find and I'll need to send on later, but the vast majority of things are now in the car.

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So she's about as ready as she's going to be. 0800 tomorrow we'll be fuelling up then heading north.

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I'll miss this car, I know that.

What's going to replace it I wonder...

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 09 Jan 2020, 02:33

Today was new car collection day. My destination was roughly 160 miles away, so a nice little run without being too much of a slog.

First order of business was of course fuelling up, for the last time. I'll miss the comedy lack of damping of this gauge. With half a tank the reading could vary between off-scale full or having the warning light on depending on which direction you were turning.

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Breakfast was then consumed and we set off. Did take a quick break to grab a drink at Norton Canes Services, and took the opportunity to snap a last photo of the Lada sticking out like a sore thumb in a modern car park.

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Little bit later and we found ourselves in an unassuming little back street, where I had a lovely chat with a gent I know from one of the other forums I'm on and handed him the keys to my Lada. Oh, and goodness only knows how many spares that I crammed into the back of it yesterday.

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I will definitely miss that car, it definitely will be up there on the list of favourites.

I drove away in something rather different though...in many ways...many, many ways.

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Which rather narrows things down doesn't it?

Yep...I've gone and taken leave of my senses!

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There were a couple of points of concern. The first was that she hasn't had a decent run in forever, had been sitting in a damp garage for the last three months, and was running on fumes. Thanks to the first few points she was running on what sounded like about seven and a half cylinders. I had a feeling though that she would clear up once warmed up properly and able to clear her throat so to speak.

First step though was to very carefully limp to a fuel station as economically as possible and fuel up.

Turns out I probably wasn't running on fumes as the gauge appears to be a little on the pessimistic side.

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My theory that we were facing a combination of fouled up plugs and a damp ignition system seemed to be on the money, as after ten or fifteen minutes once we got onto the motorway she smoothed out. Obviously I'll need to see if that remains so when next started up from cold...but I reckon she'll be fine. Ignition system service will definitely be on the to do list anyhow though.

Back home a few hours and 180 miles later, she was running really sweet.

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I also made a quick run round to our local Shell fuell station to throw some V-Power fuel in. Running the numbers from the trip home showed an economy figure of 18.7MPG. Given she was running horribly for a portion of that and we had a fair bit of stop start traffic on the M1 that's actually better than I expected. If I can keep my average in the high teens I'll be very happy...though around here I'm not expecting it! MK is just murder on fuel economy, and there's really not much you can do about it.

Safely home.

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Fun fact: Photographing a black car after dark is really hard.

The important details.

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Original stereo still fitted which is nice to see, though the speakers have been upgraded at some point.

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The lamp which provides illumination of everything aside from the instruments, trip computer and gear selector via fibre optics is obviously in need of replacement as it barely manages to provide a feeble glow - though they're not the most effective at the best of times.

Dash lighting is just fine at least.

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Speaking of the instruments...I was surprised to see that the indicator lamp on the dash for the rear window demister is green...know that was quite common back in the 60s and 70s, but surprised to see it on a car from 1985 in green rather than amber.

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For all they have their drawbacks it's hard to deny that Jaguar used to make some incredibly inviting interiors...

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Also it has to be noted that I love the camera on this phone. That was taken completely freehand.

Observations.

[] Drives far, far better than expected for a 30+ year old Jag which has actually been used rather than pampered every day of its life. Absolutely no knocks or clonks from anywhere in the suspension etc.

[] Judder when braking (noted by former keeper), suspect a flat on the brake discs from when the car was standing around a couple of years back.

[] Electric mirrors refuse to adjust (noted by former keeper), suspect dirty switch contacts.

[] Air conditioning disabled (noted by former keeper) due to the clutch on the compressor pulley failing.

[] Veneer on most of the interior wood needs refinishing (been wanting to try to do that for years!).

[] Cruise control doesn't work.

[] Windscreen wiper blades need replacing as a matter of urgency.

[] Interior is a bit musty courtesy of spending months in a damp garage.

[] Exhaust was knocking against the underbody when we started out, but it cut it out once the misfire sorted itself out.

[] Tyres aren't the best.

[] Needs a thorough clean inside and out.

Very happy. Very, very happy.

Really looking forward to getting stuck into things tomorrow and getting to see if properly in daylight and get to know the car a bit better.

I'd originally been planning this to be a way to scratch the itch for a Jag which has been there since I spent a while driving the dark green one here.

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Not really intending it to become a long term resident...however can already see it getting under my skin.

It just feels exceedingly special...

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by xantia_v6 » 09 Jan 2020, 08:49

You seem to have a few little jobs waiting for you on the XJ-S. The non-working cruise control is sometimes caused by someone plugging the vacuum hoses up wrongly so that the cruise gets no vacuum, or even someone discarding the bellows unit for easier access to the spark plugs. The other common fault that I remember is the vacuum valves in the bellows unit getting gummed shut. Note that there is a safety valve on the cruise that was added in a recall (after an american wrote off his car in a car park and then blamed the cruise control), and this does not appear in the service documentation for a car of that year.

On the subject of spark plugs, be very careful when removing or replacing them, as they are threaded into the alloy heads at an odd angle, and many have been previously cross threaded and strip very easily, particularly the front plugs which are mostly hidden by the A/C compressor. Most plug spanners wont reach these, the plug spanner originally supplied in the tool kit will, or you need to find one with a U/J very close to the top of the plug.

When you are feeling a little more adventurous, I can give you my method for balancing the throttles.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Lada Riva, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 10 Jan 2020, 04:10

Got my insurance sorted out this morning, a whole £10 a year more than the Lada. Not going to complain there.

Didn't actually get a huge amount done today car wise between having to spend a huge chunk of time in the morning mopping all of the downstairs floors as one of the dogs had thrown up during the night and then walked in it about a thousand times. Lovely. Then in the afternoon after about half an hour the heavens opened.

Wasn't a total loss though, did get a couple of things done.

Yesterday the clock being wrong was driving me round the twist. I am somewhat autistic and have borderline OCD where things like that are concerned. After far more random jabbing of buttons than it really should have taken (eventually doing exactly the same thing I'm sure I tried twice yesterday!) I got it sorted.

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For future reference, you hold down reset while pressing the buttons with the secondary markings for hours and minutes. Still surprises me that the lights in the actual buttons of the trip computer are incandescent lamps, figured they would be green LEDs, even this far back.

Conditioning the leather was next up. It was definitely in dire need of it. Usually with this stuff you apply it, wait ten minutes then buff off any excess. That step wasn't really necessary as it virtually all absorbed immediately. I'll basically keep repeating this daily until it stops drinking the stuff!

Gave the plastics a quick wipe down too, then cleaned the windows so I could actually see out of it. They had acquired that horrible grey film that cars in storage always seem to which made driving at night downright unnerving.

While the seats and door cards in particular still need a deep clean, it looks a lot better. I'm prioritising preservation of the condition of the leather over making it pretty at this stage.

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It's definitely an "occasional" four seater, though is far better than the Audi TT my housemate currently has in which it is honestly impossible to fit a human being more than three years old in the back seat. I have a hilarious photo of my husband trying to fit in the back of the one he had a couple of years ago. Biggest challenge with the rear seat in the XJ-S is actually getting out! My back doesn't bend especially well and my spine is taller than the door aperture is tall! So I sort of have to reverse out on hands and knees...not graceful! Thankfully it's not so bad from in the front.

While I was outside I was able to shuffle cars around a bit and confirm that there is *just* enough space to get the Jag actually on the drive behind the van and still open the garage door. Long car is long. This was of course an excuse to grab a couple of extra photos in actual daylight.

This was before I moved the van the last 6" or so forward, but I can actually get it in without the tail end sticking out of the drive. Seeing this on the drive I have a feeling will take a long while to get old...even when it's bleeding me dry through repair and fuel costs.

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That will look so much better for a really thorough polish and wax I think.

Last task I got to today was grabbing a fresh set of windscreen wiper blades to replace the ones on the car which were beyond useless. Much better now.

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Being able to see where you're going is a bonus. Speaking of that, I've put three dessicant packs in the car today to hopefully draw some of the moisture out of the interior. I don't *think* I have a water ingress issue, more it's just sat for the last three months in a garage with a known damp issue. Hopefully that will clear up pretty quick.

I was very pleased when I went to run out to grab a few things today that she started first touch, running on all cylinders. So yesterday's poor running does appear to be a result of disuse, damp and stale fuel.

I enjoy a few of the details of this car which while feeling somewhat futuristic in some aspects, show the age of the design. For instance the light on the dash to indicate a fault logged by the fuel injection system clearly predates the common symbol for the "check engine" light we're used to these days...and it would be tricky to fit some text like that into the tiny 1/2" square warning lights...so the "lightning bolt" signifying an electronic issue is used instead.

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Silly little things like that interest me far more than they probably should.

Hopefully the weather might be better tomorrow so I can at least get a few decent photos! So far I've only managed in the dark, drizzle or poorly parked in a supermarket car park. I need to do better.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by xantia_v6 » 10 Jan 2020, 08:17

You seem to have a good example there, I hope that the tin worm has not got to it. The panel above the sill in front of the rear wheels is usually the first to go, and the front inner wings were also getting crusty on my 1985 XJ-SC V12 before I sold it.

The oil pressure reading looks suspiciously high, these engines have (by design) a very low oil pressure at idle, usually about 25 psi when hot, but Jagaur said that 5psi was sufficient for warranty purposes, and Smiths made a special oil pressure warning light switch that operates at 2 psi, as early owners were complaining about the warning light coming on with standard 4 psi switches.

I Think that the lightning bolt warning light is just for the alternator charging status. There is no diagnostic output at all from the Lucas fuel injection system, and no computer diagnostic port. Software upgrades are done by changing the EPROM.

Some of the technology on these cars is rather primitive, but you have to remember that the mechanical desgn is borrowed from the MK 10, and S1 XJ6 which were designed in the late 50s and mid 60s. The XJ-S project was started in 1968, but the death of the designer (Malcolm Sayer), the reluctance of BL to spend any money on tooling and problems getting the XJ12 and then the XJC into production delayed the production date from the intended 1971 until 1975. It is a remarkable testament that the design with mainly cosmetic changes was in production until 1996, and the floorpan/suspension even longer under the skin of the Aston Martin DB7.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 10 Jan 2020, 12:17

Interesting. So is the warning light with the conventional battery symbol on it a "state of battery charge" indicator instead then? I'm familiar with that concept as Lada had a setup like that on the later Nivas. Explains why it fades out slowly after the engine starts though.

There is an issue with the oil pressure gauge itself we think. The sender was changed because it used to jump to full scale as soon as the ignition is turned on. New sender it does the same thing. Disconnecting the sender however and the gauge drops to zero, so it's not a grounded signal wire. Makes me feel a bit better about the oil light taking a moment to go off on startup though.

Speaking of oil, that will be getting changed probably this weekend. I've no idea how long it's been run with the misfire and how much fuel that's dumped into the sump as a result (though the oil doesn't smell of fuel at least).

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by xantia_v6 » 10 Jan 2020, 19:48

Can you take a photo of the oil pressure sender and note any numbers stamped on it? There were at least 3 incompatible versions fitted (the one originally fitted to my car was only used in 1975 and 1976 and is is impossible to find). Your symptoms indicate that an early sender from an E-type or XJ12 S1 has been fitted, as these are cheaper and easier to find (but don't work in an XJ-S).

Thinking about it, the lightening symbol warning light is an over-voltage warning,

Do you have a service manual for the car? I have an original paper version which I purchased from Jaguar in 1985, there are now scanned copies available from JDHT. Be warned that the manual structure is dire, they wrote the manual in 1975 and it is 99% correct for a 1975 model year car (of which only 200 were built), but after that it was updated with cumulative annual supplements, so especially for the electrics, you need to know which year a particular feature was introduced of updated to know which supplement to look in for the service information. As far as I know, the scanned manuals you buy now are still in this format, but maybe they have redrawn the wiring diagrams to be readable.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by van ordinaire » 11 Jan 2020, 01:08

My 1st XJ40, at least, had a "Check Engine" light that said just that - very American! (later changed because nobody understood what it meant) so it seems unlikely your much earlier model had a symbol or, indeed, any such warning light.
Not a big fan of cruise control, limited use, often dangerous to operate, cheap gimmick I wouldn't expect to work on a car that age (like so many "features/functions" on what I still think of as modern cars) & would be quite content to leave well alone. However I do remember when I liked everything to work, whether I like/used it or not (I think I was finally cured of that when I realised the failed electric headrest on the 1st STS was never going to work!)
Interesting obs. about oil pressure sender - although I suspect it's probably easier to get the right one now, than it was then.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by Zelandeth » 11 Jan 2020, 01:28

Interesting. The first car I've seen an overvoltage warning light on. Sensible thing to have though.

Not a bad shout if there are multiple sender's which will physically fit. I believe Moss were the source of the sensor, and I don't recall them having the best track record for providing the right parts. I'll get a photo of it when I get a chance...and once I find it. To the rear of the left hand cylinder head if I remember correctly. There are a couple of manuals in the boot, though I've no idea which ones yet.

Had precisely zero time to do anything practical today. I did manage to snap a few better photos while on the way home from running a couple of errands though, and grabbed a couple of videos while en route. Was getting tired of not having any decent shots to show anyone of such a good looking car.

Here we go. This car park is very useful for this purpose - even if the sun being so low was a little awkward.

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Quite the menacing front end to see in your mirrors chasing you down...

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Though realistically...this is what you'll most likely see. Briefly, before it disappears into the distance anyway.

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Will obviously have to retake these once she's been properly polished and waxed.

The photos do flatter the car a bit, she's a ten footer really. There's been a respray done at some point which is neither fantastic nor terrible. There are a few imperfections (mainly some runs in awkward areas).

Here are a few random closer photos, showing areas where I seem to recall rot being an issue on some cars.

Offside front wing.
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Offside rear wheel arch. This has been dubbed back, treated with Vactan and then drowned in Dinitrol or similar by the previous keeper with the aim of stopping it from rusting any worse until it could be tackled properly. Can't really fault the logic there.
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Rear screen surround. Could see this being an utter nightmare to sort it there was any serious rust here. Thankfully doesn't seem to be much beyond a few spots.
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This is one of the areas of less than perfect paint. Not sure if there's a rust bubble under here or if it's been a reaction with the original paint. It's solid and not crunchy at least.
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Couple of tiny blemishes by the screen surround.
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Nearside front wing.
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Nearside door handle needs some help.
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Nearside rear arch is pretty much identical to the offside one.
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Wheels have a couple of small blemishes but are in astonishingly good shape to be honest.
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So she's no concourse winner, but is absolutely presentable I think and will clean up lovely with a bit of elbow grease.

Sounds healthy enough and drives well though.

When collected from the previous owner she was obviously struggling a bit, running on about seven and a half cylinders. How about now? Well see for yourself.





Aside from the brake judder, not too bad at all.

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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog - Xantia Activa, Jag XJ-S, Sinclair C5, Mercedes 208D, AC Model 70.

Post by xantia_v6 » 11 Jan 2020, 04:05

The oil pressure sensor should have a single off-centre spade terminal on the top. If it has a double spade connector in the center it is the wrong sort.

Your engine does not sound quite right, there could be several things going on, it sounds too raspy just after starting, has it had the air intakes modified?
It could also be the sound of extra air valve, which is an emissions control thing that I always disconnect when I get hold of one of these. The system retards the timing for 15 minutes after a cold start, and to stop the engine stalling opens a solenoid to allow extra air into the engine.
There is also a hint of something else which could be a blowing exhaust, or could be a timing chain rattle (which is not a good thing on these engines).